A story of Vibro-Acoustic Disease, VAD

By Robert W. Endlich

This is a story of the discovery of a new effect of sonic vibrations, Vibro-Acoustic Disease, but it is a far cry from the sounds of human voices, birds, or the rustle of breezes through leafy trees. It is the story of discovery of dangerous low frequency infrasound, frequencies below what humans normally hear and measure for protection from deafness. It is the story of low frequency infrasound causing debilitating effects on humans and other forms of animal life.

A Portuguese Doctor finds problems with Aircraft Maintenance Workers

This story starts in 1980 when Dr. Nuno Castelo Branco was assigned as chief medical officer at OGMA, the Portuguese Air Force Aeronautical Plant near Lisbon, and his visits to his workers while at their work sites; one such occasion occurred during an aircraft engine run-up. One of the maintenance workers on duty during the run-up wandered towards the turbine engine exhaust, seemingly without purpose, and a colleague grabbed him before he was injured. Dr. Castelo Branco observed this abnormal behavior, called “automatism,” and, after examining medical Continue reading “A story of Vibro-Acoustic Disease, VAD”

An Analysis of the Grisham Energy Plan

by David Tofsted
Candidate NM House, District 36

[David Tofsted, CASF member and a candidate for the NM House of Representatives in NM District 36, has also posted a similar analysis of the Grisham Energy Plan on his own web site at this link. Ed.]

SUMMARY:

Contained herein is a preliminary attempt to bound the cost of the proposed Grisham Energy Plan. This plan calls for renewable power in New Mexico to account for 50% of all electrical power used by 2030, and increases that to 80% by 2040. The current document attempts to assess the costs of the Grisham plan by three different methods, and by employing two sets of

Photo by Pixabay

assumptions for one of the methods. The metric used for assessing cost was the surcharge to the average NM household yearly electric bill. In each case the cost per household was found to be on the order of just over one thousand to several thousands of dollars of added expense per year over the full 20 years of the plan.

The lowest estimate obtained was $1,500. The high estimate was  approximately $6,653. The remaining two estimates were $3,200 and $6,000. Based on the variability of assumptions and range of estimates it is Continue reading “An Analysis of the Grisham Energy Plan”